Category Archive for: .NET Architecture

The Role of C# in the .NET Enterprise Architecture

C# requires the presence of the .NET runtime, and it will probably be a few years before most clients particularly most home computers – have .NET installed. In the meantime, installing a 01 application is likely to mean also installing the .NET redistributable components, Because of that, it is likely that we will see many C’ applications first in…

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Creating .NET Applications Using C#

C# can also be used to create console applications, text-only applications that run in a DOS window. You will probably use console applications when unit testing class libraries, and for creating UNIX or Linux daemon processes. More often, however, you will use C# to create applications that use many of the technologies associated with .NET. This section gives…

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Namespaces

Namespaces are the way that .NET avoids name clashes between classes. They are designed to prevent situations in which you define a class to represent. a customer, name your class Customer, and then someone else does the same thing (a likely scenario – the proportion of businesses that have customers seems to be (quite high). A namespace…

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.NET Framework Classes

Perhaps one of the biggest benefits of writing managed code, at  east from a developer’s point of view, is that you get to use the .NET base class library. The .NET base classes are a massive collection of managed code classes that allow you to do almost any of the tasks that were previously available through the…

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Assemblies

An assembly is the logical unit that contains compiled code targeted at the .NET Framework. “Assemblies,” we summarize the main points here. An assembly is completely self-describing and is a logical rather than a physical unit, which means that it can be stored across more than one file (indeed, dynamic assemblies are stored in memory, not on…

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A Closer Look at Intermediate Language

From what you learned in the previous section, Microsoft Intermediate Language obviously plays a fundamental role in the .NET Framework. As C# developers, we now understand that our C# code will be compiled into IL before it is executed (indeed, the C# compiler compiles only to managed code). It makes sense, then, to now take a closer look…

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Language Interoperability

The use of IL not only enables platform independence; it also facilitates language interoperabilitv, Simply put, you can compile to IL from one language, and this compiled code should then be interoperable with code that has been compiled to IL from another language. You are probably now wondering which languages aside from C# are interoperable with .NET,the following…

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Performance Improvement

Although we previously made comparisions with Java, IL is actually a bit more ambitious than Java byte code. IL is always Just-in- Time compiled (known as JIT compilation), whereas Java byte code was often interpreted. One of the disadvantages of Java was that, on execution, the process of translating from Java byte code to native executable resulted in…

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Platform Independence

First, platform independence means that the same file containing byte code instructions can be placed on any platfonn at runtime, the final stage of compilation can then be easily accomplished so that the code will run on that particular platform. In other words, by compiling to IL you obtain platform independence for .NET, In much the same way…

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The Common Language Runtime

Central to the .NET Framework is its runtime execution environment, known as the Common Language, Runtime (CLR) or the .NET runtime. Code running under the control of the CLR is often termed managed code.  However, before it can be executed by the C.L.R, any source code that you develop (in C# or some other language) needs to be…

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